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Description
  
  

Specialized equipment and trained staff for high temperature materials testing.

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Unique equipment and trained staff for specialized sensor fabrication and evaluation

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Unique equipment and trained staff for specialized sensor fabrication and evaluation

https://icis.inl.gov/SiteAssets/SliderImages/HTTL/specialized2.jpg
  

Unique equipment and trained staff for specialized sensor fabrication and evaluation

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HTTL certified for testing fuels and structural materials

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Specialized equipment and trained staff for high temperature materials testing.

https://icis.inl.gov/SiteAssets/SliderImages/HTTL/mat-prop-test2.jpg
  

Specialized equipment and trained staff for high temperature materials testing.

https://icis.inl.gov/SiteAssets/SliderImages/HTTL/mat-prop-test3.jpg
  

Unique equipment and trained staff for specialized sensor fabrication and evaluation

https://icis.inl.gov/SiteAssets/SliderImages/HTTL/specialized4.jpg
  

Specialized equipment and trained staff for high temperature materials testing.

https://icis.inl.gov/SiteAssets/SliderImages/HTTL/mat-prop-test4.jpg
  

Experience staff provide training, analysis, and consulting services on severe accident phenomena

https://icis.inl.gov/SiteAssets/SliderImages/HTTL/httl1.jpg
  

Experience staff provide training, analysis, and consulting services on severe accident phenomena

https://icis.inl.gov/SiteAssets/SliderImages/HTTL/httl2.jpg

​​​​Established in the 1990s, the High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL) attracts work from key U.S. and international research organizations to study severe accidents in nuclear reactors. It is a multi-purpose facility that is uniquely equipped for such research.

In recent years, the HTTL staff has attracted funding for high temperature material property testing and for instrumentation development and testing from a host of nuclear and non-nuclear programs.  Development activities have already led to several specialized sensors, such as the High Temperature Irradiation Resistant Thermocouples (HTIR-TCs), the Transient Hot Wire Method Needle Probe (THWM NP), Micro Pocket Fission Detector (MPFD), ultrasonic sensor technologies,  silicon carbide temperature monitors, a creep test rig, and encapsulated melt wires and flux wires, for in-pile high temperature measurements of fuels during irradiation. Specialized equipment for instrumentation fabrication and evaluation at the HTTL to support this project includes several high temperature tube furnaces, a high temperature vacuum furnace, several autoclaves, a laser welder, and a real-time x-ray imaging system. 

The HTTL has established itself in the international community with an impressive number of publications in archival journals and peer-reviewed conference proceedings. Several products developed by this group have received patents or have patents pending. The HTTL has been relocated to the Energy Innovation Laboratory (EIL) in Idaho Falls.  In addition to existing HTTL equipment, this facility includes several new features such as a clean-room capability for sensor fabrication.

Below are HTTL key capabilities:

  • Specialized Instrumentation Development and Testing

    • The HTTL staff designs, develops, and evaluates specialized high-temperature sensors for nuclear and non-nuclear applications, including new methods for measuring temperature, thermal conductivity, and deformation in nuclear materials and test reactors. HTTL houses specialized equipment to support that work, including high-temperature tube furnaces, a high-temperature vacuum furnace, swagers, a draw bench, a laser welder, a helium leak detector system, a real time X-ray imaging system, and various high-temperature material property measurement systems to provide comparison data. Several customers are now using HTTL-designed sensors for nuclear and non-nuclear high temperature applications. HTTL's efforts also support key INL initiatives that require specialized in-pile sensors for fuels and materials irradiations, such as the Nuclear Science User Facilities, the Next ​Generation Nuclear Plant, and the ​Fuel Cycle Research & Development program.         

  • Material Properties Testing

      One of the HTTL staff's primary tasks is to test materials used in nuclear reactor core and support structures. Researchers use several methods to measure material properties, including laser flash thermal diffusivity, pushrod dilatometry, and differential scanning calorimetry systems at the HTTL. This multi-purpose lab is equipped with high-temperature furnaces (capable of heating to 3000 °C) and autoclaves, which allow researchers to obtain high-temperature properties for existing and advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) materials and to test potential coatings for specific LWR components. In addition, material property measurement systems provide staff comparison data from in-pile sensors being developed at HTTL.        
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